Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, 2001 an assessment of natural resource, economic, social, and institutional issues with a focus on the Upper Klamath Basin

Cover of: Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, 2001 |

Published by Oregon State University Extension Service in Corvallis, Or .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Klamath Project (U.S.),
  • Water resources development -- Klamath River Watershed (Or. and Calif.),
  • Irrigation -- Klamath River Watershed (Or. and Calif.),
  • Klamath Basin (Or.),
  • Klamath River Watershed (Or. and Calif.)

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementWilliam S. Braunworth, Jr., Teresa Welch, Ron Hathaway ... [et al.].
SeriesSpecial report -- 1037., Special report (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 1037.
ContributionsBraunworth, William S., Welch, Teresa., Hathaway, Ronald L.
The Physical Object
Pagination401 p. :
Number of Pages401
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16117086M

Download Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, 2001

No refuge in the Klamath Basin. Tupper Ansel Blake photo from the book Balancing Water: Restoring the Klamath Basin Eventually, the Klamath Reclamation Project. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered species.

The case was filed in latethe year there was an announcement that no water would be available for Klamath Project irrigation from Upper Klamath Lake.

The plaintiffs claim that if the water is taken under the Endangered Species Act, the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution requires payment of compensation for the water right, a form. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered : One of the documents you cite frequently for various points is the OSU/UC Davis report “Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project: ”.

This comprehensive compilation of information has many authors with a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and very divergent opinions on some of the important issues. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered species.

Relationships between Lost River and shortnose sucker biology and management of Upper Klamath Lake, pp.IN Braunworth, W. S., Jr., T. Welch and R. Hathaway (eds.) Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, an assessment of natural resource, economic, social, and institutional issues with a focus on the Upper Klamath Basin.

Water War in the Klamath Basin: Macho Law, Combat Biology, and Dirty Politics [Holly D. Doremus and A. Dan Tarlock]. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klam.

Department of Interior v. Klamath Water Users Protective Assn., U.S. 1 (), was a United States Supreme Court case decided in The case concerned whether Exemption 5 of the Freedom of Information Act, which applies to "intra agency memoranda or letters", is applicable to documents within the Department of the Interior which discussed plans for the allocation of water in the Klamath Citations: U.S.

1 (more) S. ; L. In another study focused exclusively on the Klamath Project areas, Burke et al. () concluded that a water bank could improve allocative efficiency within the Klamath Reclamation Project.

Carlson, H.L., and Todd, Rodney,Effects of the water allocation decisions on the agricultural landscape and crop production in the Klamath Reclamation Project, in Braunworth, W.S., Jr., Welch, Teresa, and Hathaway, Ron, eds., Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project: an assessment of natural resource, economic, social.

Water War in the Klamath Basin Macho Law, Combat Biology, and Dirty Politics. by Holly Doremus and A. Dan Tarlock. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates.

In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon’s Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered species/5(3).

“Effects of the Water Allocation Decisions on Project­area Communities.” Pp: ­ in Braunworth, Welch, and Hathaway, eds., Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An Assessment of Natural Resource, Economic, Social, and Institutional Issues with a Focus on the Upper Klamath Basin.

Carlson, H.L., and Todd, Rodney,Effects of the water allocation decisions on the agricultural landscape and crop production in the Klamath Reclamation Project, in Braunworth, W.S., Jr., Welch, Teresa, and Hathaway, Ron, eds., Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project—An assessment of natural resource, economic, social.

The use of groundwater to supplement surface-water supplies for the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Project in the upper Klamath Basin of Oregon and California markedly increased between and Pre groundwater pumping in the area where most of this increase occurred is estimated to have been ab acre-feet per year.

Subsequent. Draft Decem Policy impacts of the Klamath decision George Woodward, Jeff Romm, and Ruth Langridge, University of California, Berkeley Overview Inthe Bureau of Reclamation’s Operation Plan for the Klamath Project initially provided no irrigation water for its agricultural contractors.

This unprecedented action had long. Downloadable. The curtailment of irrigation on the Klamath Reclamation Project in is estimated to have cost farmers more than $35 million.

This study examines how alternative water allocations among irrigators in the Upper Klamath Basin could have lowered those costs. Per acre marginal water values vary by a factor of 20 due primarily to variations in soil productivity, with the highest.

Klamath Basin Irrigation Related History: History of Klamath County irrigation, the Klamath Project, and other important events leading to the Water Allocation Decision (Reclamation and Herald & News archives) Klamath Basin Crisis.

For farmers in the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath (Oregon) Project, their contract provided that Reclamation would deliver water when available, except in cases of force majeure, unforeseeable. The Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), an agency located within the DOI, administers the Klamath Irrigation Project (Klamath Project).

The Klamath Project uses water from the Klamath River Basin to irrigate overacres in Klamath County, Oregon, and two northern California counties, primarily for agricultural purposes. Professor Doremus has published widely in the areas of environmental and natural resource law.

Her latest book is Water War in the Klamath Basin: Macho Law, Combat Biology, and Dirty Politics (Island Press ), co-authored with CPR Scholar Dan Tarlock. Before moving into law, Professor Doremus was trained as a biologist. Water allocation alternatives for the upper Klamath basin.

in Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An Assessment of Natu- ral Resource, Economic, Social, and Institutional Issues in the Upper Klamath 13asin, W.S. 13raunworth, Jr., T. Welch, and R. Hathaway, eds. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Extension.

Braunworth, William S., Welch, T. and Hathaway, R. “Background” in Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An Assessment of Natural Resource, Economic, Social and Institutional Issues with a Focus on the Upper Klamath Basin.

Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An Assessment of Natural Resource, Economic, Social, and Institutional Issues with a Focus on the Upper Klamath Basin This publication provides information on the timing and pattern of biomass accumulation and nitrogen (N) uptake for a variety of Pacific Northwest crops.

Water War in the Klamath Basin book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between /5. Jaeger, W.K., “Water Allocation Alternatives for the Upper Klamath Basin.” Chapter 19 in: “Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An Assessment of Natural Resource, Economic, Social, and Institutional Issues with a Focus on the Upper Klamath Basin” by Oregon State University & University of California, December Review of the relationships between bald eagle biology and federal environmental decisions on the Klamath Project.

Pages in W. Braunworth, Jr., T. Welch, & R. Hathaway, eds. Water allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, An assessment of natural resource, economic, social, and institutional issues with a focus on the Upper.

The flip side of the Oregon story can be seen in the erosion of conditions for collaboration when, as a result of the Klamath Reclamation Project, farmers lost the water allocation on which they relied.

In her report (with Richards, Corson and Case) on this case. for the Reclamation Service, investigated the Klamath region at the request of Fredrick. HNewell, who would later become Director of Reclamation. Whistler recommended a controlling damat the lower end of Upper Klamath Lake to retain enough water to irrigateacres.

InNewell visited Klamath and assessed the project's possibilities. In April the Bureau of Reclamation determined that it could not release the normal allocation of water from Klamath Lake to farmers in the Klamath Irrigation Project.

In a period of drought, the Bureau found that the water was needed to protect two species of endangered fish in Klamath Lake. water for hydroelectric power generation for residents of the Pacific Northwest.

These and other human uses of water have significantly reduced the amount of water available to support what once was an incred­ ible array of wildlife within the basin. In the thick of this competition for water are the Klamath tribesCited by:   () See Klamath, 67 Fed.() ("The Klamath Project provides water to aboutacres of irrigable land, as well as several national wildlife refuges."); Kandra v.

United States, F. Supp. 2d(D. ) (stating that the project provides water for the lower Klamath and Tule Lake national wildlife refuges). Klamath River Basin Issues and Activities: An Overview Summary The Klamath River Basin, an area on the California-Oregon border, has become a focal point for local and national discussions on water management and water scarcity.

Water and species management issues were brought to the forefront when severe drought in exacerbated competition for scarce water resources and generated.

Bureau of Reclamation: Effect of water-column pH on sediment-phosphorus release rates in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, / (Portland, OR: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S.

Geological Survey ; Denver, CO: USGS Information Services [distributor], ), also by Lawrence H. Fisher, Tamara M. Wood, and Geological Survey (U.S.) (page images at. accounting of this year=s water allocation. He referred to the Upper Klamath Lake Water Use chart (See Handout Agendum 5: UKL Water Use Graph).

In response to a question by Dave Bitts, Dan Fritz said the proposals for demand reduction were part of a one.

A: I can tell you what the conflict was all about. In the summer ofit was a critically dry year in the northwest and the Bureau of Reclamation, which operates the Klamath irrigation project, announced it wouldn’t deliver any water to irrigators at all.

That had never happened before. About this book. In the drought summer ofa simmering conflict between agricultural and environmental interests in southern Oregon's Upper Klamath Basin turned into a guerrilla war of protests, vandalism, and apocalyptic rhetoric when the federal Bureau of Reclamation shut down the headgates of the Klamath Project to conserve water needed by endangered Range: £ - £ book Water war in the Klamath basin: Macho law, combat biology, and dirty politics, which provides a comprehensive analysis of the history of water development and conflicts in the Klamath basin up to mid Two well-renowned experts on environmental law, with.

A water rights adjudication by the state of Oregon (in progress since the s) is ongoing. Inthe adjudication reaffirmed “time immemorial” tribal water rights in the upper part of the Klamath Basin, confirming that tribal water rights are senior to those of other water rights holders.

Following a severe drought inhundreds of farmers in the Klamath Basin who irrigated with water from the United States Bureau of Reclamation's Klamath Project received no water deliveries, as the Bureau took drastic action to comply with its duties under the Endangered Species Act and leave water stored in Upper Klamath Lake.

Buy Water War in the Klamath Basin by Holly D. Doremus, A. Dan Tarlock from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones Pages: Duringa severe drought occurred in the Klamath River Basin.

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) determined that the newly issued biological opinions and their RPAs must prevail; thus, water that would have gone to irrigators was directed almost entirely to attempts to maintain minimum lake levels and minimum flows as prescribed in the two RPAs.

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